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fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Dream flying by df h) *European Kingfisher

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Dream flying by df h)
*European Kingfisher

Tags: BIRDS
Quote
"Do not worry about continuity—it will always be satisfied by anything you can construct (wise-guys who like using the axiom of choice will have to worry about it, along with wolves under the bed, etc)."

Strichartz, in A Guide to Distribution Theory and Fourier Transforms (via mathprofessorquotes)

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thorinbaggins:

perf

thorinbaggins:

perf

(Source: memewhore)

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Quote
"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

Everyone go read this immediately. As I decided last week, my life motto has been expanded from “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it” to include “If all your favorite books are by white men, I probably don’t think you’re a very interesting person.”

(via pollums)

(via pollums)

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Tags: Cats
Photoset

feriowind:

so-i-did-this-thing:

neuralhandshake:

Imagine my surprise when Pacific Rim again has a huge presence at SDCC.

This is Prop Store London’s auction offerings on display. I wasn’t expecting these, so I didn’t bring my DSLR with me, but man was it cool to see Striker Eureka’s suit.

The Legendary booth, as well, is hardcore decked out Pacific Rim. There’s a few themed props (don’t worry, I took photos too) and the booth workers are wearing costumes/pieces from the film.

There’s an Oculous Rift demo that I didn’t get a chance to try yet, as well, so I’m going to make a beeline to the Legendary booth first thing when the floor opens tomorrow.

'til then, enjoy these! 

neuralhandshake comes through again for PacRim SDCC pics!

i want all of these things

ALL OF THEM

Text

svrferblood:

me when buying something over $10: do i need this? do i need any material objects? will this matter when i face the great abyss?

(via nosuchthingasunicorns)

Video

cishaming:

squeakykins:

logicalmania:

hophigh:

YOU GUYS TURN ON THE SUBTITLES

AHH I NEED A MINUTE

I KNEW IT

"MY LOVE, ANNA." HOLY SHIT. HOLY FUCK. IS IT ACTUALLY A LOVE STORY? IS THIS MOVIE ACTUALLY A QUEER LOVE STORY?!

Keep an eye out on theater listings! It’s Studio Ghibli which means it’s very likely to have an American theater release!

(via unconscioustime)

Audio

howtobeaheartfaker:

deelekgolo:

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oh god i knew it was going to be this sound that sound grosses me out so much ew ew ew

Is this what sex sounds like?

(via cynicalslut666)